If You Think Your Decisions Aren’t Impacting Others, Think Again

Do you know HOW many people are impacted by your choices?  Like really.  

Think About It.  

I just got off the phone with a client who was making a job decision and she brought up how thankful she was that I had the courage to pursue being a life coach.  

She said from that I am now helping her see her brain and live courageously and make hard job decisions confidently.  

So from my one decision, I am helping her and her decision which will then impact the lives of almost 100 children this year.  100 children who desperately need her to love them, encourage them, teach them how to do hard things, and achieve what is possible in their lives. 

They need her to show them what is impossible for their life.  And then make it possible.

What is the residual impact of your decisions? Whose lives are your ripples touching?

Who is impacted by your decisions?  Not just your family and friends.  Who could be impacted that you don’t even know?  

If you decide to get control of your finances and turn down all the cute clothes you want and drinks to drink and food to eat, it doesn’t just impact your wallet.  

It impacts the wallet of your parents, spouse, and friends because you wouldn’t have to take from theirs.  Now all of you have more money.  

They might see that you’re an example of what is possible and decide to do the same thing; now they are impacting all of their circle.  

I’m not saying buying clothes, drinks, or food is bad.  But I don’t think we realize the impact of those small choices and WHO they impact.  

Sometimes it takes courage to turn down the Target run of a shirt, a lamp, and new office supplies.  And that’s okay.  Not all hard decisions are taking career leaps.

For me, I will never know the 100 children, but my life is touching theirs.  My one decision to pursue the uncomfortable and unknown career of being a life coach is impacting hundreds.  

What could your decisions be doing?  

Best Case Scenario – A Decision Making Tool

Here’s one tool I teach my clients.  Best Case Scenario.  

You have a decision to make. Let’s say there are two options. Decide now that both options will turn out to be perfect – exactly how you’d want them to go. If that were the case, which one would you choose?  

That’s it. That’s the tool. Seems so simple and not effective, right?  I know. But try it. 

Here’s an example.

Recently, my husband and I found a house that just had framing up and we loved the floor plan.  It was perfect for our small family. And, if we bought now, we could finish building it.  We’d get to pick all the things.  So fun!

However, it was located much farther from my 2nd job and it was outside of our big city.  Away from all the restaurants and shops and activities we like to do.

We had to decide and we had to decide fast if we wanted to pick all the things.

Do we sell our home in Atlanta which is smaller and farther away from Darin’s work, and buy the bigger, newer home outside of Atlanta, or do we stay?

If we stay, we have to save more money to buy the type of house we want in the area we want.  And we’re not completely sure we’d find a house with this great of a floor plan.  

So how did I finally decide? Best Case Scenario. If all things worked out, and we moved out to the suburbs and loved our house and neighbors and restaurants and shopping or if we stayed and we saved up money in the next year and a half and found an amazing house in this location, which one did I really want?  

We stayed.  

Using The Best Case Scenario takes off the need to analyze all of the what-ifs, the cons, and constantly think about what could go wrong.  It makes a decision out of strength and abundance, not fear and scarcity.  

It’s so simple, and so effective.

Try it out and let me know how it works for you. Then try to share it with your teen!